Sappho in Paris: The Poetic Value of Lexical Cosmopolitanism

Despite the occasional vague pronoun reference or f-bomb, I've always fancied myself a relatively articulate and polite English speaker (growing up so close to Canada has its consequences). En français, however, I undergo a Jekyll-like transformation from Midwestern Judith Martin to angry truck driver doing stand up for the French navy. A typical conversation is … Continue reading Sappho in Paris: The Poetic Value of Lexical Cosmopolitanism

Remembering Zines: Rubber Cement, Cheese, and Doing Your Thing

Some people enjoy the lingering smell of petrichor before a rain, freshly cut lawns, gasoline, the sweet notes of vanilla and almond found in the underlying mustiness of old books.  I always enjoy hearing about people's favorite scents because they tend to be anchored to memories fossilized in time; one of my friends loves the … Continue reading Remembering Zines: Rubber Cement, Cheese, and Doing Your Thing

Learning Storytelling through Comedy

In​ ​2007,​ ​the​ ​comedian​ ​Mike​ ​Birbiglia​ ​released​ ​the​ ​album​ My Secret​ ​Public​ ​Journal.​ Incidentally,​ ​this​ ​was​ ​the​ ​year​ ​I​ ​started​ ​to write.​ ​I​ ​had​ ​listened​ ​to​ ​stand​ ​up​ ​before,​ ​but​ ​Mike’s​ ​was​ ​different. My​ ​experience​ ​with​ ​stand-up,​ ​up​ ​to​ ​this​ ​point,​ ​had​ ​been​ ​listening to​ ​Steven​ ​Wright​ ​on​ ​road​ ​trips​ ​with​ ​my​ ​dad.​ ​And​ ​while​ … Continue reading Learning Storytelling through Comedy

Grammatical Mistakes You Shouldn’t Be Making Anymore

I believe that a writer ought to love and respect the English language in the same way that a musician ought to revere their instrument. Jimi Hendrix would not have been able to make the spell-binding music that he did if he didn’t respect his instrument, granted, he wasn’t the most technically polished guitarist, and … Continue reading Grammatical Mistakes You Shouldn’t Be Making Anymore

Advice from an Almost Graduated English Major to Future English Majors

            I would like to start off by saying: Congratulations! You’ve passed the first test that all aspiring English majors encounter when choosing a major. That is, when people found out you graduated and launched into the same three questions (Where are you going to school? What are you majoring in? What do you want … Continue reading Advice from an Almost Graduated English Major to Future English Majors